Helium isn’t just for balloons. It’s a valuable technology resource

Kids may know that balloons are bad for wildlife. This is because, when it’s filled with helium, a balloon can travel many miles into the sky before it loses the ability to float. When it falls back to Earth, the string, rubber or Mylar becomes a hazard for birds, turtles and many other creatures that can become tangled in or choke on what they mistake for a tasty treat.

But many people don’t realize that there’s another reason to hang onto those balloons: The helium inside is a rare resource.

“I think that one of the coolest things is that helium is the second-most abundant element in the entire universe, but ironically, on planet Earth, we only have very, very small amounts,” said Santiago Toledo, a chemist at American University in Washington, D.C.

Helium One Global Ltd (LON:HE1) was founded in September 2015. The Company’s focus is to explore, develop, and ultimately, become a producer of high-grade helium for the international market, a critical material essential in modern technologies.

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