Top five subscription business trends for 2021

As the subscriptions industry proves its resilience to the shocks of 2020, we look ahead to what big trends we think are in store for businesses in 2021, a year of consolidation and transformation.

Though the subscription sector weathered the storm of COVID-19 largely unaffected, with many companies even thriving amidst the economic downturn of 2020, businesses must now ask themselves if and how they can outlast this boom period. A range of new developments are set to further shake up the industry into 2021 and beyond as massive changes to the ways that we interact with the wider world become established.

Here are five trends that we think will define the subscriptions industry in 2021.

Cerillion plc (LON:CER) is a leading provider of billing, charging and customer management systems with more than 20 years’ experience delivering its solutions across a broad range of industries including the telecommunications, finance, utilities and transportation sectors.

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